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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 112 (some duplicates have been removed)
this was not political, it was not for this, this, and this reason, it was in fact trying to make sure the mesh economy was on solid base and that we could get some jobs back. >> we're about four minutes from the beginning of that q&a session. we are monitoring mr. bernanke's address, art. we'll bring you the session when it does begin. >>> bond traders also keeping a very close eye on mr. bernanke and his remarks and the upcoming q&a that we'll bring you. rick santelli tracking the action at the cme. reactions? >> i've been phoning around. there is a very common thread especially among a lot of the futures traders. they keyed if on one sentence of ben bernanke. we'll show it on the screen. we expect that a highly accommodative stance of monetary policy remain appropriate for a considerable time after the economy strengthens. and this is what traders were not happy about. i talked to two or three traders that said they're going to be moving now almost exclusively in trading non-financials, commodities, precious metals, and his opinion -- things that the fed can't print. they also think that ultimately
, and the economy will be front and center. what are the important economic numbers to listen for? >> susie: and metro p.c.s. says "hello" to t-mobile, in a merger that will make t-mobile the fourth largest wireless carrier in the country. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! >> susie: private sector hiring was surprisingly perky in september. that's according to data out just two days before the government's crucial and more complete monthly jobs report. payroll processor a.d.p. said employers added 162,000 jobs last month, stronger than expected. but the pace is slowing, and numbers for july and august were revised lower. still, there are signs the job market is improving, but no where close to replenishing the jobs lost in the great recession. suzanne pratt reports. >> reporter: few things would make more americans happy than a healthy job market. from recent college grads to president obama, their future might look more certain if companies really ramped up hiring. economists say there's too much uncertainty on the horizon for that to happen any time soon. the good news is that fi
all out in september, a hopeful sign that the u.s. economy may be picking up. >> tom: i'm tom hudson. ben bernanke defends his strategy at the federal reserve to do more to help the economy. >> susie: and how technology is making it possible for doctors to go paperless. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! >> susie: the first day of the new quarter, kicks off with a blue chip rally. investors were encouraged by a report showing that american factories were busy in september. a popular index of national factory activity rose to 51.5 last month, from 49.6 in august. it was the fastest pace of production since may. but that upbeat news was overshadowed by comments from federal reserve chief ben bernanke, saying the economy is not growing fast enough to bring down the unemployment rate. we'll have more on that in a moment. those two events led to volatile trading here on wall street. the dow rose about 78 points, but was up as much as 155 points earlier. the nasdaq drifted in and out of positive and negative territory, finally losing more than 2.5 points, and the s&p rose almost fo
questions after his speech. let's listen in. >> japan, of course, is the first modern economy to be trapped at the zero bound. interest rates close to zero. their experience foreshadowed the global financial crisis of 2008. the japanese had a stock market booming bust and a property boom and bust together which was roughly double the size, proportionally speaking, to the united states. it was a major shock to the economy. they have responded to it to a variety of tools. i think a couple things that we learned from watching their experience and troubles and difficulties they have been through and to that i would point to that we have tried to learn from them, the first is, aggressiveness, early aggressiveness of monetary policy. what we learned from japan is we learned from the 1930s. once you have a deflation, prices dropping, prices and wages are dropping, they can be very very hard to get out of that. there is a lot of downward pressure on the economy. we were very aggressive early on in the united states to avoid deflation and we have maintained inflation close to our 2% target which is
continue rising and consumers become more confident-- two bright spots of the economy. was the bank bailout overdone? hear what a former top regulator says about the rescue. former fdic chairman sheila bair joins us. and if american airlines and its pilots strike a deal tomorrow, it could mean fewer delays for customers and the company's bankruptcy. that and more tonight on nbr! captioning sponsored by wpbt >> tom: some encouraging news tonight for the housing market and consumer confidence. first, housing-- a measurement of prices in 20 cities across the country rose four tenths of a percent in july. that's the sixth straight month of gains for the s&p case- shiller home price index. and consumer's are feeling more optimistic. the conference board's confidence index rose to 70.3 in september, marking its highest level since february. these two groups, consumers and housing, are significant because of their influence over the entire economy. >> with the improvement in consumer confidence, we think that consumer spending could pick up as we go into next year. especially since the housing mar
president obama. but mitt isn't having it, trying to get ohio voters to the right by focusing on the economy. >> with incomes going down, every year, every year going down, down, down. prices of electricity up and health insurance up and the cost of gasoline, having doubled, these are tough times. even for families with jobs. i know what it takes to get this economy going again. cheryl: so what would a tax plan under a romney/ryan administration look like? rich edson breaks it down for us. rich? >> reporter: well, cheryl, democrats call it a giveaway to the rich at the expense of the middle class. republicans say they're wrong, and this morning governor romney defended his tax plan. >> by the way, don't be expecting a huge cut in taxes because i'm also going to lower deductions and exemptions. by bringing rates down, we'll be able to let small businesses keep more of their money to hire more people. >> in the end the details are really up to congress. romney's proposed cutting every tax rate by 20%. to insure the treasury department takes in about the same amount of money under a new system,
, but the fact he was not speaking optimistically about the economy and the effects of qe3 on the economy sent a damper on the stocks. a nice way to begin the day with 75 up on the dow, 3.6 on the s&p, and, again, nasdaq is the only one in the red. lauren: sometimes the fed tie doesn't list everything. silver ending at seven month highs. look at that. david: oil, a little of a rise, natural gas, though, we want to focus on natural gas because we have seen that thing grow for the past month or so. it was up 5% today. if you're looking for some play in energy, oil seems a little too hectic for you, go to natural gas. with ce get -- can we get that up there? okay. switch to airlines. lauren: they are seeing a pop today. as you see, there was a report out earlier saying the outlook for the airline industry is improving. that's a good sign. look at that. up arrows across the board. david: ibm, you knew it was a pick when warren buffet went in there. today, look at this, an all time 10-year high at the top there trading at $210.43 per share. that was a 1.5% jump today. a nice big move by ibm. fed ch
's a point you made earlier in an earlier segment that the bottom line is the economy is still very, very weak. i'll tell you, we've been on overweight equities for the last six or nine months. we're now starting to pull back some of the risk. yes, the market could rally higher. i don't see the stimulus up as much as i did when everybody didn't believe qe-3 was coming. i think there's more negative potential headlines. we're taking risk off the table right now and hopefully we'll re-enter at a lower position. >> it's interesting. rickntelli, the fiscal cliff keeps coming up. that's one of the biggest issues in terms of keeping businesses from making any real decisions here, putting money to work, and it's also the highlight going into the election. >> it is. i guess the real irony is even if the fiscal cliff didn't exist, the outlook economically, both domestically and globally, is deteriorating. really, it's a bit of a double whammy. i'll go back to what i said the last time we discussed this an hour ago. if you look at the 21 weeks from mid-october to march of 2000 when the nasdaq crash
: nicole thank you. dagen: take a look at this. the u.s. economy growing at a very weak 1.3% in the second quarter, revised down from 1.7%. that is, well, lousy. connell: deputy editor at the "wall street journal"'s editorial page is here to tell us it's always the economy, stupid, at least that was your column? >> that's right. and any presidential election one way or another it is going to be about the economy, no matter how hard the candidates try to deny that. the most amazing one perhaps of all time is indeed the incumbent obama who is running as though the economy during his term didn't happen or at least if it happened, it was the fault of somebody who was president four years before him and what he wants to talk about is the economy he's going to create starting in january 13 which will consist of people having green jobs, making windmills and solar panels. i think the american voters are probably getting a little bit frustrated that no one will talk about the economy as it exists right now, dropping to 1.3% in the second quarter. the united states economy is barely, barely moving.
to stimulate the economy. again, i put stimulate in quotes because who knows if it is momentary for china. >> we have this bump of china of 2.5%, you can't underestimate the short-term tailwind, whatever they have for the economic expansion, especially on commodities prices. that is part of the reason why we have a significant progress. david: were you aware of all this? that is basically what it is. were you worry about it? >> i am very suspicious and wary. however, i don't think that the close is clear. a little bit underweight equities, as you well know, a lot longer for state solvents. david: keep the sound there. i want to hear there is any interaction. tim is joining us right now. when we think about these honeypots in the market? >> i agree with him. the market is clearly ignoring the negative news that we are seeing in the u.s. and the fact that we are in a recession and maybe longer in europe. it is not deterring people from buying stocks right now. you could certainly call it a bubble in general. i think equities was probably overheated here. given the weak industrial numbers, g
. on the issue that's supposed to be republican mitt romney's strength, the economy, he's trailing the president with a "new york times" news poll showing on the question of who can better handle it, ohio voters give the president an edge of 51% to 45%. >> i woke up every day doing everything i can to give american workers a fair shot in the global economy. >> there's danger signs. they declared ceos see slower economic growth the rest of the year with lower expectations for sales, capital expenditures, and hiring. the chairman of the round table, boeing chairman, said in a statement, quote, "the down shift in quarterly sentiment reflects continuing concern about the strength of the recovery including uncertainty over the approaching fiscal cliff." the sour report is more significant because he chairs the president's export council. >> i know that all of us, business or government, share the goal of strengthening our economy and creating more jobs. >> another vulnerability for the president could be the deficit promising to cut it in half by the end of the first term, but it's topped $1 trillion
such difficulty, you know, in the economy because of federal reserve policy. likelihood of hearing this, very very slim. and maybe seeing how would you balance a budget? in our campaign we had a precise plan of cutting a trillion dollars and balancing the budget in three years. you know, we're in this horrendous crisis and neither one of them are going to say anything, oh, maybe we ought to cut something. there's no proposal to cut anything. it's also tinkering around with massive automatic increases and the american people are starting to wake up and realize it is all fiction and they are not serious. connell: congressman paul, thanks as always. >> thanks. connell: fox business network, beginning at 8:00 p.m. eastern live from denver, neil cavuto will be on the next hour to talk about the debate. neil cavuto. dagen: the economy will be a big focus of tonight's debate. adp the payroll processing firm came out earlier this morning and reported that 162,000 private sector jobs were added last month. more than expected. to weigh in on that, and the debate, the head of u.s. interest rate strategy at u
's not forget we also had a dismal report on durable goods orders, once again showing weakness in this economy. investors not worried about these numbers today. >> we got decent news out of europe and china this morning. either way, we're asking if investors should think twice before buying into this kind of a rally based on what the u.s. economy is telling us right now. let's talk about it in today's "closing bell" exchange. we have larry blazer from mayflower advisers and our own rick santelli and mandy drury. larry glazer, you happen to believe that economically there's an iceberg dead ahead. this market doesn't act like it today. >> no, it doesn't. you can see today investors are so focused on the global stimlouse story that they're missing the big picture. the big picture is the fact that the economic data, particularly global manufacturing data, is absolutely rolling over. look at chinese manufacturing, down 11 months in a row. you hit the nail on the head. gdp, durable goods, all a sign of weakness. the problem is the catalysts are behind us and the icebergs are ahead. you've got the fi
oversight council headed by the us treasury said it is preparing to act to protect the economy. >> if investors get any sense that there might be a failure, they'll all race for the exit. and that's the equivalent of a run on the bank and there is no one there-- no one like a parent with capital or the fdic to supply capital if there's that kind of race for the et. >> reporter: three options are on the table. instead of a fixed value of $1, money market funds could be required to use a floating value. regulators are also considering whether money market fund companies should hold some of their assets as a buffer against a surge in withdrawals or whether to require investors to wait before they can get back a portion of their money. the s.e.c. could try again to pass new rules, but if it doesn't, the stability council could decide some big money market funds need closer regulation. that idea worries fund companies. >> it would result in significantly more costs and regulation and who would want to invest in a fund that the federal government has designated as systemically import
the rest of the economy has started to feel the effect from the sluggish manufacturing sector. if you look at the breakdown of the services pmi, the construction services sub index -- meanwhile, new orders were dragged lower by demand weakness for transportation. over in australia, a survey showed an even grimmer picture as its services index dipped to 41.9 in september. india reports its all important services pmi tomorrow, while hsbc is out next monday. that's all from me. >> thank you very much. >>> coming up on today's show, we head to paris to find out more, the attempts to offload his unit. then to hong kong where we examine the political transition in china plagued by scandals and disappearances. we get an expert view on the new leadership change. >>> and next, washington and its debate tonight as romney and obama finally square off. we'll have a preview of what to expect and what's at stake with our very own democrat-republican panel. >>> and real estate is on the rise. we head to new york with founder barbara corcoran. mariano rajoy has denied reports that spain will request a bai
losing steam. let's take a look at some good news economy released. institute for non manufacturing index rose 5 to 55.1 in september. that is up from last month. any reading above 50 signals activity is expanding. on the jobs front private sector payrolls increased by 162,000 last month according to the payroll processing firm adp. that is higher than expected. positive news boosting stocks, the dow losing steam. volume below average even by recent standards. hewlett-packard the biggest drag on the dow hitting its lowest level in ten years after the company issued a very bleak forecast for the 2013 period due to a decrease in technology spending worldwide. oil falling well below 9500 in terms of slowing demand. the impact of china and drop in oil prices making the energy sector the worst performing sector today. oil settling down by $3.75. i am here filling in for liz claman because liz claman is in cleveland, of ohio. her old stomping ground as part of the open for business series and liz will talk to business leaders to find out how the city turned itself around. we want to know. give
geo politics has upped the price, but now the slowing economy is questioning how long traders can hold on to those premiums. you can't outrun economic fundamentals no matter how much you print. >> what do you think about that, bill? even though corporate america looks strong, looks like the earnings estimates need to come down. >> i think the summer of dal droms are about over. going forward, the thing that might be the big spark that changes the psychology and the ball game is the election. i don't believe all the polls. we'll see what happens. if we're right that there's a seat change and some fellas join the unemployment line deservedly, then you might see money be put to work. this fiscal cliff and all the other nasties we hear about are not going to be permanent dampeners on the economy. i think you have to look forward and anticipate what's next. >> is it the same scenario -- >> that one i disagree on. >> okay. bill, are you looking at different scenarios if the president wins re-election versus a romney win? how are you playing that? >> well, number one, i don't think anybody's
. the payroll services firm, adp, said the economy added 162,000 private sector jobs last month. that topped estimates of 143,000. now the august number, that was revised down by 12,000 to 189,000. of course we have to look ahead to the big government jobs report to flesh this all out on friday morning. >>> the services sector that expanded at its fastest pace in six months in september boosted by a pickup in new orders. the institute for supply management nonmanufacturing index that looks at 18 services industries increased to 55.1 last month from 53.7 in august. david: all right. we've got all this covered plus a lot where we have larry shoafer in the pits of the cme group. bob phillips, telling us why the recession already here. legendary investor wilbur ross who needs no introduction and will tell us what is he investing. larry over at the i know talking with nicole that hewlett-packard was bringing down the whole index. you look at oil. it is hard, you can't call it a crash but a 4.25% drop in oil is the biggest drop we've had in months. doesn't that show you that we're at a tippingpoin
output at a plant as the economy slows and demand weakens. meantime 40% of china's iron ore mines are standing idle as steel prices have crumbled. and loans to firms and households fell more than expected. ecb staying loans to the private sector fell 0.6% from the same month a year ago. italy's borrowing costs falling at a bond auction today. analysts say the auction shows nand for italian government paper remains healthy. and eu regulators are prepare to go charge microsoft for failing to comply with a 2009 ruling. that ruling had on ordered the company to offer user as choice of web browsers. apparently they may not have done that. if guilty, microsoft could face fines of up to 10% of its global revenues. and that would be a lot of money. >> iran still, we're this close to nuclear -- think our unfunded labels are like 60 trillion or something. europe back in the crapper, but the refs. huh? >> i told you, i don't always like unions. i'm actually happy that the refs union won. >> it does provide a release from some of the travails and the worries of every day life. spoorts is spor
now, we see an economy which is expanding. we see employment which is one of the key indicators of recession, still growing. so we expect the economy to continue to grow. that's our best forecast as of now. so we're not expecting a recession. that being said, with an economy growing only sort of 1.5% to 2%, that is not fast enough to lower the unemployment rate. that is my concern. >> all right. we have reaction now to that. and today's big gains in our "closing bell" exchange, plus we're talking strategies for the coming quarter. a quarter that has historically been good for the bulls. with us today, todd of black bay grou group. paul shots of heritage market. and our own rick santelli. paul, i'm going to start with you because you make a bold statement. you feel right now ben bernanke is irrelevant. what do you mean in. >> bill, i think the fed's done the most part, they've laid all their cards on the table. if you're playing poker, they're all in. it's qe unlimited. if $40 billion is not enough, they'll go to $50 billion, $60 billion, $100 billion. each qe has had less of an
the economy likely added 155,000 private payroll jobs this month. we'll bring you the number and get you instant reaction from joel prakken. in corporate news, richard schultz is pressing forward with a possible $11 billion buyout of the retailer. schultz and at least four private equity firms have reportedly started examining the books of the economy. at the same time, he is said to be negotiating individually with the pe firms on the details of how his roughly 20% stake in the company would contribute and what role he might be playing after a buyout. and oracle ceo larry ellison says the company won't be making any major acquisitions during the next couple years. in an interview on "closing bell" yesterday, ellison said he is instead focused on growing organically. he also discussed the dividend. >> that's the decision of the oracle board of directors. i believe we'll gradually increase the dividend as opposed to dublg it or tripling it all at once. nothing dramatic. >> shares of oracle during the last year, take a look at it. 31.65. he's gotten close to the top there, joe. >> all righ
. the economy is obviously a big part of this story. the qe announcement providing a shock to stock. we'll talk to charlie evans at 8:30 eastern time. and then it is your money, your vote. we'll start the countdown to the first presidential tee batd, that is on wednesday night. we'll be turning to a pair of political strategists in the next half hour for a preview. plus a cnbc exclusive, julia boars sten catching up with sheryl sandberg. including just how many people put everything about themselves online. >> does it scare that you you've helped create a generation of oversharers? >> i think what we give is people the ability to share what they want. what is one person's ridiculous oversharing is another person's regular day and we build technology that lets users share what they want to share and that's tremendously exciting. >> julia will join us with more of that conversation coming up at 7:30. and we'll find out why craig barrett is not a facebook fan. and in sports news, yes, europe has retained the ryder cup. staging a comeback after the u.s. began sunday with a big lead. europe has won
while consumer prices slipped further in august raising fears the world's third biggest economy could yet fall into recession by year end. >>> what a big day. >> super friday. >> we have the french budget proposal, the results of the spain audit/stress test, we've got, what else -- it's the end of the quarter. britain is announcing it libor reforms. >> that's not what i was talking about. it's the ryder cup, folks. forget all that stuff. >> by the way, i had to google the ryder cup. >> far more important event. >> we'll talk about that later in the program. >> i don't know who insisted on that, but apparently we are going to cover it. >> before we get to that, the government of hollande is about to present it first budget. its expected to whicheverdelives of tax hikes. meantime european policymakers are appraising spain's reform plan. but today the government must brace for the results of the banking stress tests that will determine the recapitalization needs of the country's most troubled lenders. we have steve sedgwick following the story in thmadrid, but firs out to stefane i
happening in the economy, disease -- does it not? >> i agree. look, there are major headwinds out there. it's hard to be positive about anything. europe's slowing down can, we're printing money like crazy, and when you're dealing with a world where the growth is coming from reducing friction as opposed to sort of increasing thrust, there's just not a lot of foundation there. there's nothing solid that investors or anyone can really stand on to be positive, in my opinion. david: and, stephen, i didn't like what ben bernanke and his buddies at the fed did, but the fact that they did that indicates that what they were seeing -- they have access to all kinds of data we don't have access to -- what they saw was something bordering on recession, otherwise they would not have gone all in as they did with qe3. >> yeah. you know, make no mistake, from the longer-term perspective, i agree. the negative impact of this easy money, you know, will catch up with us, but i think it's still several years down the road and probably comes most likely in the form of inflation. but right now particularly the eq
18,000 jobs in the sector. that is where the economy is being structured these days. 10,000 jobs in construction. manufacturing, 4000 jobs. melissa: we were looking at 113, does that make that same life? i just want to remind everyone that is not a good number. >> finding the list that the government number includes state and local layoffs. i don't think that adp number includes that. when you look at those two numbers since january, you will see a defeat for 172,000 jobs a month where it is about 150,000. it has to be above 200,000 to keep up with population growth. again, 8.2% we are looking at coming in for friday. lori: full employment around 4%? nobody talks about that anymore. >> we just talk about the jobless rate. lori: the temperature is going down, find your heating costs going way up? the impact the winter will have on the economy. melissa: take a look at metals had with those who break. gold trading up. copper, basically what. we will be right back. ♪ you see us, at the start of the day. on the company phone list that's a few names longer. you see us bank on busier
. this is for that reason. their economy will suffer a double little bit. they need crude-oil. people driving cars over there show the market coming of the way it did. those cracks blew out today. refinery fire in canada turned out to the storage tank. if you look at the cracks between the prices of crude oil versus gasoline that made a tremendous move today and there are other factors. may be a blip in that market but those cracks have been strong going forward so you will see strength in the product versus crude even if the crude comes -- will move out. cheryl: one other issue. talking about the election and november around the corner. do you find people sort of have true conversations about investment decisions at the end of the year? >> absolutely and people will be more concerned about that in october. the first of three presidential debates was the vice-presidential debate. people are disgusted with the lack of movement in washington concerning the fiscal cliff so part of the problem, the apathy in the market is people don't know where to go. very unclear and the light at the end of the tunnel is
for pouring more fed dollars in economy, and the markets pulled back. rich edson will have more on mr. bernanke's speech coming up. and the dow is still up, 161 points, that is the biggest intraday point gain, by the way, since september the 13th financial stocks leading the dow right now including, yes, the bank of america, america express, jpmorgan all having banner days. microsoft remaining the biggest laggard after two price targets cuts from jeffrey's and rbc. we've got traders at the new york stock exchange, the cme group and the nymex. let's take a look at the cme, charlie needles, the cme. charlie, what a day? is it all on the back of the ism numbers? >> it is. you know, chi pmi came out overnight, and that showed things have stabilized there, in china. european pmi was in line, not lighting the world on fire. a little concern over the employment situation there. but if you look at the breakdown of the u.s. pmi, you kind of hit on all cylinders. the prices paid was actually a little higher, but if you're trying to reflate the market, that's a decent measure. it had been 54 las
: cheryl: and biotech's a leader sector today. america's ceo has spoken and their outlook for the economy pretty dire. not the markets but the economy. what do they want to see and what are their ideas for jump starting america? former michigan governor and president of the business roundtable joining us live. dave: with sales up 95% year to date looks like everyone is thinking small these days. general manager -- that is the smart car. it is a fox business exclusive. cheryl: numbers are huge up 120% for sales year-over-year but first we will tell you what drove the market with the data download. a mixed day with the s&p 500 and the nasdaq eking out gains in the last few minutes of trading. that shows real resilience in the last few minutes. materials and consumer discretionary were the biggest laggers but you saw biotech and utility as the top performers. the euro pull away from the u.s. dollar and down three weeks gaining for the second straight day versus the greenback growing expectations with spain getting closer to seek a bailout from the euro zone boosting currency but the head of
hoarding cash during the recession and are now eager to spend it on new homes on signs the overall economy is improving. but that increased demand has brought more competition for lots. >> now you have end users who are buying for themselves, you have other builders who are doing spec homes, so lot prices have gone up significantly in the last ten months. >> reporter: new home prices are also rising. the commerce department said last month alone they were up more than 11%. but while this is all good news for an economy that hasn't had much of it lately, morningstar economist robert johnson says the market still has to make up a lot of lost ground. >> if you look at housing starts at the peak we were over two million starts. i'd say based on population the number should have been about a million ana half. now we're down around 750,000 in terms of housing starts so we're kind of half of what i view as normal. >> reporter: one wild card for builders is the ongoing uncertainty about the bush tax cuts. subkowiak says if those tax cuts aren't extended some potential buyers could put a hold on bu
they will turn it into something political. it will really be hard, when you think about the economy we are in right now, how can you tell individuals we will raise the price of work did right now we need more work. it would be a bad time to do that. both sides will ultimately agree on that. dagen: we are looking at this calendar with 20 days left at work just for the representatives to deal with this. why isn't the uncertainty, why isn't there any other business that would impact the economy. >> it is entirely possible. you would almost think if the economy or the marcos thought they would let us reach the cliff go over it, you would see a lot of forward activity. the fact you are not seeing it suggests that markets think we get to the final days they will actually come to a deal. a little over a year ago it was that we were days from government default, but, ultimately, they came to a deal. dagen: john, good to see you. as always, thank you. connell: breaking news now. it is on the libor investigation. this is from the exclusive reporting from our own charlie gasparino. chuck grassley
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 112 (some duplicates have been removed)